Khara Bhaath Courtesy: K. Raghunanadan

The word “Khara Bhath” is to a large extent credited to the hotel industry. They were the
ones who popularised it, but it is also made in some form at home. Incidentally, the instant
version (made by MTR, Bangalore) is available for those “quickies”. Really, khara-bhath
is a variation to Uppittu (Uppumav) in that instead of the chili etc, the Saambar powder is
used to provide both khaara (eravu, theekha) and flavour. Bhaath (means rice in Marathi) is
used in Karnataka in a very liberal sense, it often applies to rice as well as things made out
of Rava (sooji). I have reproduced my Saambar recipe to include the Khara-bhath which
can be done using the saambar powder.
i) To make powder
The sambar powder can be made and kept for use upto 8 weeks (after that the flavor goes
down). Take equal quantities of Dhaniya seeds and red chilies (one handful of each, for a
small bottle-full of powder). Fry them “together” with a “few drops” of oil-just enough to
keep the “Baanale”(WOK) oily. (You will find that using 2 spoons at diagonals makes it
easy to fry). Fry on low fire till you get that “nice-smell” with very little fumes, take out
before dhaniya starts changing colour (the other indicator is the red chilies become shiny
with oil). Put them on a plate to cool.
Put half handful of chana daal (kadale bele) and half of udad daal (uddina bele) and fry
slowly using 1 teaspoon of oil. Fry till both start to turn brown then add two table spoons
of dry coconut (grated coconut normally available in all supermarkets will do well – but
not the sweetened variety). Also add a pinch or two of HING powder. Just “one-piece” of
daalchini chekke (pattai) must be added now. Some dried curry leaves and a pinch of
turmeric are also be added at this stage (if you have them). After adding these do not
continue frying for long, not more than a few seconds. Allow these to cool in the Baanale
(WOK), by switching off gas and keeping the Banale on another (cold) stove, for example.
Powdering with dry grinder: Firstly, powder the dhaniya and chilies. After finely done,
take out and then put the cooled ingredients of daals etc. Grind them well, then add the
powdered chili, run the dry grinder once more to mix. Take out, mix with a spoon and store
in a cleaned bottle, close it tight. Some people add turmeric only at the stage of mixing, this
is to retain the grinder for getting the “yellow” tinge of turmeric. But turmeric is essential
for the “keeping quality (storage)” of the powder.
ii) To make Khaara Bhaath
The sambar powder can be used to make the vegetable Bhaath, Khara Bhaath, Vaangi
Bhaath etc. Here, cook the rice with a little short of water (to keep it from becoming
soggy). Spread the cooked rice to cool. In a separate pan with 2 spoons of oil heated, put in
mustard, after they split/splash (putr … putr…..putr), add a pinch of turmuric and then put a
piece or two of broken red chili (depending on how hot you want,add more) put 1 handful
of groundnuts (cashews if you prefer)fry them for a few seconds,add curry leaves. Now put
the cut vegetables or Badane Kaayi (baingon or egg plant) if it is vaangi-bhaath. Turn
around, cover the lid and cook or low fire. After the vegetables are done, put salt to taste.
Allow cooling time. Put the cooled rice, put 2-3 table of the sambar powder, little salt
(only to make-up for the rice now added). Add freshly grated coconut (fresh coconut pieces
put in dry grinder and done), Mix with hand well using 1-2 table spoon of oil and also at
this time squeeze in the juice of half a lime. Keep it away for an hour or so. Reheat (in
oven/microwave) before serving.
Instead of rice, medium size rave’ (sooji, rava, samolina) can be used to make Khaara-
Bhaath. In this case, the rave’ is first dry fried on a low fire (use just one tea-spoon of ghee
or a small piece of butter if you prefer) till it is rid of moisture. Then fry finely cut
vegetables in 2 teaspoons of oil, then add water and salt to taste. Continue to heat till the
water starts to boil and then bring down the heat and add the dry fried rava slowly. Add 3-
4 tea spoons of oil, sprinkle 2-3 spoons of sambar powder, cover the lid and keep on very
low fire for 2-3 minutes. Open the lid, add the juice of half a lime, turn around, add grated
coconut. Turn off the fire. Add one or two teaspoons of ghee and close the lid. Before
serving, turn around slightly and serve hot.

18 thoughts on “Khara Bhaath Courtesy: K. Raghunanadan”

  1. Dear Raghu

    I liked all your recipes here and have tried them out. Best of all the majjige huli one.
    I like your comments like – Kasigondu Kodubale. Keep it up. Can you tell me where can I find more of your recipes.

    Please reply soon.

    Regards
    Manjunath

  2. I have tried all your recipes and it had come out perfectly and your explanation is really very good.

    Can u please send me a receipe on Masoopu Saru

  3. Your line-up of KARNATAKA RECIPES are quite good. Why not add different varieties of PALLYAS, BADANEKAAI YENNEGAI GOJJU, MUCHHORE, HULI-AVALAKKI, HURIGAALU, SANDIGE, KOOTOOS, SAAGU, OBBATTU, MYSORE-PAK, RAVE OONDE,MOSAPPU, HITHAK AVAREBELE,KADLE-KAALU OR ALASANDHI KAALU HULI WITH BOODKUMBALAKAI OR BRINJAL OR SEEME-BADANEKAI,NUCHINA-UNDE, BASSARU etc etc. to make it more authentic. Of course, cooking varies from family to family and so does the taste!

  4. I would like a recipe of Khara bun. If any of you could please share it with me, it would be wonderful. I like trying out new things and this is one recipe that I have not got but would like to try.

    Thanks in advance.

  5. I would like a recipe of Khara bun. If any of you could please share it with me, it would be wonderful. I like trying out new things and this is one recipe that I have not got but would like to try.

    Thanks in advance.

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